Things I Ate In General

This is a food blog that isn't always totally about food.

The Pentahotel in Prague is worth staying at just for the breakfast buffet. Also, the toiletries are adorable.  View high resolution

The Pentahotel in Prague is worth staying at just for the breakfast buffet. Also, the toiletries are adorable. 

So, yes. The whole point of this trip was for me to go back to Prague, which happens to be where this blog began. Immediately after getting off the train from Budapest at Hlavní Nádraží and dropping our luggage at the hotel we headed to dinner at Pivovarský Dům

My favorite Czech food is a dish called svíčková, which is marinated beef sirloin in gravy. It’s usually served with bread dumplings and a little bit of cranberry sauce. Pivovarský Dům serves my absolute favorite svíčková in all of Prague. They also brew an amazing sour cherry beer. I had been waiting almost four years to eat this exact meal, and it was just as good as I remembered it.

 

I didn’t have a ton of time to plan the details of our time in Budapest because I was out of town for work right up until we left. The bulk of my research consisted of reading this NYT article, which led us to Kádár Étkezde.
In the piece the restaurant is described as a “Hungarian-Jewish spot with self-serve seltzer bottles on the table, red-and-white checkered tablecloths and a packed crowd.” There was no way we were not going there. They have weird hours and at first we tried to go for dinner, found it closed, and then came back the next day for lunch. 
In Central Europe, in my experience, Jewish restaurant is not always synonymous with kosher restaurant. I am glad about this. I have eaten some good kosher food, but I have also eaten some baaaaad kosher food. Even in Jerusalem, which is literally kosher city. So, this food wasn’t kosher. And it was great. I ordered boiled beef with horseradish, which came with perfect, fluffy, buttery mashed potatoes. This isn’t something my Jewish grandmother has ever cooked for me, but it’s related to many things that my Jewish grandmother has cooked for me. That’s what’s cool about heritage. View high resolution

I didn’t have a ton of time to plan the details of our time in Budapest because I was out of town for work right up until we left. The bulk of my research consisted of reading this NYT article, which led us to Kádár Étkezde.

In the piece the restaurant is described as a “Hungarian-Jewish spot with self-serve seltzer bottles on the table, red-and-white checkered tablecloths and a packed crowd.” There was no way we were not going there. They have weird hours and at first we tried to go for dinner, found it closed, and then came back the next day for lunch. 

In Central Europe, in my experience, Jewish restaurant is not always synonymous with kosher restaurant. I am glad about this. I have eaten some good kosher food, but I have also eaten some baaaaad kosher food. Even in Jerusalem, which is literally kosher city. So, this food wasn’t kosher. And it was great. I ordered boiled beef with horseradish, which came with perfect, fluffy, buttery mashed potatoes. This isn’t something my Jewish grandmother has ever cooked for me, but it’s related to many things that my Jewish grandmother has cooked for me. That’s what’s cool about heritage.

Minnesota State Fair | 2014 New Foods

Less than two months until the Great Minnesota Get-Together! Time to start planning!

This plate of goulash moved me almost to tears. That might have something to do with it being the first meal I ate in Budapest after flying for almost 15 hours straight, but I kind of don’t think so. It was that good.
Our hotel was across the street from Heroes’ Square (Hősök tere), which is not a super restaurant-centric part of town. With the help of the Lonely Planet website we found our way down Dózsa György út to Paprika. I’m not sure there is anything more fitting than eating your first meal in Hungary at a place called Paprika. View high resolution

This plate of goulash moved me almost to tears. That might have something to do with it being the first meal I ate in Budapest after flying for almost 15 hours straight, but I kind of don’t think so. It was that good.

Our hotel was across the street from Heroes’ Square (Hősök tere), which is not a super restaurant-centric part of town. With the help of the Lonely Planet website we found our way down Dózsa György út to Paprika. I’m not sure there is anything more fitting than eating your first meal in Hungary at a place called Paprika.

Remember this article, about how you can make a tortilla de patatas (aka tortilla Española/Spanish omelette/Spanish tortilla) using potato chips? Well, I tried it. The final product is, in my opinion, not quite the same thing as a real tortilla, but it tastes good and you can easily throw one together in 20 minutes. Yay chips!

No matter how early I get to set on our LA shoots, the Off the Shelf catering truck is already there, with hot coffee, ready to take breakfast orders from our entire crew. The Off the Shelf guys are some of the kindest, most pleasant people on the planet. Every interaction I have with them makes me feel like I’m going to be okay even though I haven’t been home or slept for more than 6 hours in weeks.
On the menu this dish is called Life Rice. It’s toasted brown rice with egg whites and spinach, topped with chili garlic sauce and sliced avocado. This is such a better breakfast than what exists on most sets. As our makeup artist said “It’s nice not to start the day with a gut bomb.” Yep. View high resolution

No matter how early I get to set on our LA shoots, the Off the Shelf catering truck is already there, with hot coffee, ready to take breakfast orders from our entire crew. The Off the Shelf guys are some of the kindest, most pleasant people on the planet. Every interaction I have with them makes me feel like I’m going to be okay even though I haven’t been home or slept for more than 6 hours in weeks.

On the menu this dish is called Life Rice. It’s toasted brown rice with egg whites and spinach, topped with chili garlic sauce and sliced avocado. This is such a better breakfast than what exists on most sets. As our makeup artist said “It’s nice not to start the day with a gut bomb.” Yep.

Another good thing about shooting in LA is that after you drop the pre-pro books off at the printer you can go eat at Umami Burger. I’m a big fan of the Truffle Burger, which features a house-made truffle cheese and a truffle glaze.

I spent a good chunk of late 2013 and early 2014 in LA coordinating some GEICO commercials. If you’ve been watching the Stanley Cup Playoffs you’ve probably seen some of them (this one seems to be getting the most play). There are a lot of good things about shooting in LA, but spending three straight weeks in a hotel gets lonely, no matter how good the room service is. 
During my most recent stretch of time there I stayed in Studio City, which, like most of LA, kind of feels like a no man’s land. On my first morning in town I ventured down Ventura Blvd and had a poki bowl (sushi rice with chunks of sashimi, seaweed, lettuce, and green onion) for lunch at Daichan. It was simple and comforting and gave me hope that I might survive the gauntlet I was about to face. And I did. View high resolution

I spent a good chunk of late 2013 and early 2014 in LA coordinating some GEICO commercials. If you’ve been watching the Stanley Cup Playoffs you’ve probably seen some of them (this one seems to be getting the most play). There are a lot of good things about shooting in LA, but spending three straight weeks in a hotel gets lonely, no matter how good the room service is. 

During my most recent stretch of time there I stayed in Studio City, which, like most of LA, kind of feels like a no man’s land. On my first morning in town I ventured down Ventura Blvd and had a poki bowl (sushi rice with chunks of sashimi, seaweed, lettuce, and green onion) for lunch at Daichan. It was simple and comforting and gave me hope that I might survive the gauntlet I was about to face. And I did.